• Among todays leading filmmakers, none brings to the screen such a deep awareness of how power is channeled from First to Third World societies, or exhibits such great human sensitivity, as Raoul Peck. Collected here for the first time are Pecks three early feature and documentary screenplays as well as his seminal film Lumumba.
    In this collection of screenplays are Raoul Pecks award-winning pair of films that cemented the directors place in the internationalist cinema canon--the documentary Lumumba: Death of Prophet and the 2000 feature film Lumumba--about the life and assassination of Republic of Congo Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba. Also included are Raoul Pecks first feature, Haitian Corner--set during the last, violent breaths of Haitis Duvalier regime--which asserted a Haitian Creole identity in Brooklyn in the 1980s, and The Man by the Shore, the first Haitian film ever to be screened in theaters in the United States and the first Caribbean film ever entered into competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Each film presented includes introductions by the author, production stills, storyboards, and poster art.

  • Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary To compose his stunning documentary film I Am Not Your Negro, acclaimed filmmaker Raoul Peck mined James Baldwin’s published and unpublished oeuvre, selecting passages from his books, essays, letters, notes, and interviews that are every bit as incisive and pertinent now as they have ever been. Weaving these texts together, Peck brilliantly imagines the book that Baldwin never wrote. In his final years, Baldwin had envisioned a book about his three assassinated friends, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King. His deeply personal notes for the project have never been published before. Peck’s film uses them to jump through time, juxtaposing Baldwin’s private words with his public statements, in a blazing examination of the tragic history of race in America. This edition of the script contains black-and-white images from the film.

  • Dans ses dernières années, le grand écrivain américain James Baldwin a commencé la rédaction d'un livre sur l'Amérique à partir des portraits de ses trois amis assassinés, figures de la lutte pour les droits civiques : Medgar Evers, Malcolm X et Martin Luther King Jr. Partant de ce livre inachevé, Raoul Peck a reconstitué la pensée de Baldwin en s'aidant des notes prises par l'écrivain, ses discours et ses lettres. Il en a fait un documentaire - salué dans le monde entier, sélectionné aux Oscars et remportant le César 2018 - aujourd'hui devenu un livre, formidable introduction à l'oeuvre de James Baldwin. Un voyage kaléidoscopique qui révèle sa vision tragique, profonde et pleine d'humanité de l'histoire des Noirs aux États-Unis et de l'aveuglement de l'Occident.

  • J'etouffe

    Peck Raoul

    "Ce matin, en me levant... J'ai pleuré. Je pensais qu'un autre monde était possible, sans qu'on ait à mettre le feu partout. Maintenant je n'en suis plus sûr du tout".

  • Exterminate all the brutes Nouv.

  • The New York Times bestseller based on the Oscar nominated documentary filmIn June 1979, the writer and civil rights activist James Baldwin embarked on a project to tell the story of America through the lives of three of his murdered friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. He died before it could be completed. In his documentary film, I Am Not Your Negro, Raoul Peck imagines the book Baldwin never wrote, using his original words to create a radical, powerful and poetic work on race in the United States - then, and today. 'Thrilling . . . A portrait of one man's confrontation with a country that, murder by murder, as he once put it, "devastated my universe"' The New York Times'Baldwin's voice speaks even more powerfully today . . . the prose-poet of our injustice and inhumanity . . . The times have caught up with his scalding eloquence' Variety 'A cinematic séance . . . One of the best movies about the civil rights era ever made' Guardian 'I Am Not Your Negro turns James Baldwin into a prophet' Rolling Stone

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